Servicemembers Civil Relief Act (SCRA)

Stateside Legal: Overview of Servicemembers’ Civil Relief Act 

The purpose of the Servicemembers’ Civil Relief Act (SCRA) is to provide protection to service members who have difficulty meeting financial and legal obligations due to their military service. Read More. 

Stateside Legal: Videos: SCRA

As a service member you have protections for you and your family under federal law.  Read More. 

Stateside Legal: Interactive Form: SCRA Screening and Resource Finder

As a member of the Armed Forces, Reserves, National Guard or other uniformed services, you have legal protections for you and your family when you are called into active duty military service. Read More. 

LawHelpNC: Guidelines to the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act

Authored by Legal Aid of North Carolina.  Legal Aid of North Carolina provides information about the impact of the SCRA when individuals involved in a lawsuit are on active duty in the armed forces including information about who and what proceedings are covered, result of a finding that a party to a lawsuit is on active duty, the impact of a stay, and more. Read More.


LawHelpNC: The American Veterans and Servicemembers Survival Guide

Authored by Veterans for America.  This survival guide provides legal information for servicemembers, veterans and their families.  See Chapter 21, The Servicemembers Civil Relief Act written by Mark Sullivan, pages 458-472, about the protections in the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act (SCRA). Read More.


UNC School of Government: Servicemembers Civil Relief Act Outline

The University of North Carolina School of Government provides an outline of key provisions of the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act. Read More. 

North Carolina Legal Assistance for Military Personnel: The Servicemembers Civil Relief Act Questions and Answers

North Carolina Legal Assistance for Military Personnel, Standing Committee of the North Carolina State Bar, answers frequently asked questions about the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act and how it impacts leases, loans, voting rights, taxes, mortgage foreclosures, and other lawsuits for active duty military. Read More.


Stateside Legal: Family Law and the SCRA: How It Works

Note: this article talk about only one part of the SCRA.  Go here to learn more about addition SCRA protections. Read More.


Stateside Legal: Interactive Form – Letter to Landlord (Eviction)

As a member of the Armed Forces, Reserves, National Guard or other uniformed services, you have legal protections for you and your family when you are called into active duty military service. Read More.

Stateside Legal: Interactive Form – Letter to Landlord Ending the Lease Early

As a member of the Armed Forces, Reserves, National Guard or other uniformed services, you have legal protections. Read More 

Stateside Legal: Interactive Form: Letter to Request 6% Loan Interest Rate

When you go on active duty, it may be hard to keep up with all of your credit payments. Read More.

Stateside Legal: Interactive Form Directory

Stateside Legal offers interactive forms that prompt the user with a series of interview questions in order to prepare a letter or other form.  Read More. 

Stateside Legal: SCRA Claims: How to Get Attorney Help

The Veterans Benefits Act of 2010 (PL 111-275, 124 Stat 2864) was signed into law on October 14, 2010.  It includes an important new provision for service members who have been harmed by a violation of the federal Service Members Civil Relief Act.  The new provision allows a Court to award the costs of litigation and reasonable attorney fees if you prevail in Court on your case. Read More.


Stateside Legal: Interactive Form: Waiver of SCRA

You and your family have certain legal protections when you are called into active duty military service.  A law providing many of these protections is called the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act (SCRA). This law helps protect members of the military and their families from financial and legal harm because of military service. However, you can waive these protections if you decide to allow a lawsuit against you to go forward. Read More.